Maitland's Legacy Week 2016

DEDICATED: Stuart Browne (left) crosses the finish line of the Dubbo Stampede while Meg and Scott Connelly (right) took on the Kokoda Track. Both Stuart and the Connellys endured in support of Legacy week.
DEDICATED: Stuart Browne (left) crosses the finish line of the Dubbo Stampede while Meg and Scott Connelly (right) took on the Kokoda Track. Both Stuart and the Connellys endured in support of Legacy week.

Across the Hunter, countless families are supported by Legacy. The charity, which aids the widows, parents and children left behind when a serving or former member of the defense force loses their life, held its annual fundraising week at the end of August.

To draw more eyes to the invaluable work done by Legacy, three people from the Lower Hunter have pushed themselves to their physical limits.

East Maitland chiropractor Stuart Browne headed West to conquer the 42.2km Dubbo Stampede Rhino Ramble. His 102 year-old ‘Gran’, Barbara Browne, is a war widow. 

Mr Browne, in his fundraising blog online, said he was inspired to run for everyone Legacy supports.

“I have no doubt that the Legacy support [Gran] and her two sons received, after losing a husband and the boys a father, in WWII, has enabled them to continue to live healthy and fulfilled lives,” he said.

“And I personally feel indebted to Legacy for that support.

“My parents Bob and Diana are also legatees in Dubbo and I am inspired by the voluntary work that they do for Legacy.

“Running the marathon is my way of giving back and honouring all the Legacy volunteers, veterans, widows, children, and especially my Gran.”

Mr Browne said he would continue to fundraise for Legacy until he reaches his goal of $3000. 

Meanwhile, father and daughter Scott and Meg Connolly headed North, to take on the indomitable Kokoda Track in the name of Legacy. Meg’s grandfather, Arthur Quintrell, was a former commander and Vietnam, World War II and Korean War veteran.

“Soldiers like my grandad did their work for us, so honouring them by walking in their footsteps is the least we could do. I’m sure he was with me,” she said.

“The terrain was slippery, sticky and rough, the hills never ending, some we scaled for four hours and many had me in tears when I reached the top. There was one stage during the first day when I wondered if my travel insurance covered helicopter evacuation.”

Donate to Stuart Browne’s cause at give.everydayhero.com/au/4-legacy-week.