Thornton Public School bush gets a makeover

GIVING BACK: International and local volunteers with Boral employees and Thornton Public School landcare coordinator Karen Brown (third from right). Picture: Supplied
GIVING BACK: International and local volunteers with Boral employees and Thornton Public School landcare coordinator Karen Brown (third from right). Picture: Supplied

A group of volunteers had their green thumbs shining bright as they worked to rehabilitate a special section of bushland in Thornton on Tuesday. 

They removed non-native plants and laid 60 cubic metres of mulch along an environmental education track at Thornton Public School, which is part of the Lower Hunter Spotted Gum Ironbark Forest – an endangered ecological community.

Five international travellers, two University of Newcastle students and two Boral employees joined conservation volunteers at Thornton Public School to complete the work.

It was part of the Boral connected communities program in Thornton, which provides help to improve the environment at schools and restore habitat for native flora and fauna. 

Boral partnered with Conservation Volunteers Australia (CVA) to implement the program.

CVA manages the program and receives support from Boral to make it possible. 

Thornton Public School’s landcare coordinator and general assistant Karen Brown welcomed the volunteers to the school and was grateful for their contribution. 

The track is a vital part of Thornton Public School’s environment education program.

It uses the track to give students an outdoor classroom where they can learn about the environment through firsthand experience and build upon their theory studies. 

“Boral is delighted to be able to contribute to Australian schools and communities by sponsoring this very worthwhile initiative,” Boral’s group health, safety and environment director Michael Wilson said. 

“Conservation Volunteers Australia is Boral’s longest standing community partner and during our many years working together we have been able to make a sustainable and valued contribution to many of the communities in which we operate.”

Mr Wilson said supporting youth through these programs helped them become positive role models in the community.