Hunter River Agricultural and Horticultural Association's show co-ordinator shares her Maitland Show journey

Tradition: Show society vice president Margaret Enright and showground coordinator Bronwyn Bell are the backbone of Maitland Show. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers
Tradition: Show society vice president Margaret Enright and showground coordinator Bronwyn Bell are the backbone of Maitland Show. Picture: Max Mason-Hubers

For a beach girl who grew up in Newcastle – and didn’t want to get her hands dirty – Bronwyn Bell says she has found her calling at Maitland Show.

The Hunter River Agricultural and Horticultural Association's show co-ordinator accidentally landed the role after lending a helping hand during the showgirl competition and feels it is meant to be. 

Before that she hadn’t been to a show since she was 16 or 17. 

“I can’t believe how its gotten into my blood, it’s my passion,” she said.

She is working around the clock to give families three jam packed days of free entertainment on February 16, 17 and 18 - once they pay the ticket price at the gate. 

Families will be able to come and sit in the grandstand and spend time together as a family watching all of the acts.The Saturday night is going to be a big family friendly event.

Hunter River Agricultural and Horticultural Association's show coordinator Bronwyn Bell

“Families will be able to come and sit in the grandstand and spend time together as a family watching all of the acts,” Ms Bell said.

“The Saturday night is going to be a big family friendly event with act after act after act so the kids stay entertained.” With HRAA president Tony Lantry at the helm – a passionate man who believes in the future of country shows – and a team who know the show as well as their own families, it is set to be the best show yet.

“It will be educating them about the farms and where it all originated from – that’s what I’m trying to implement,” Mr Lantry said. 

“Going back to the old horse and dray, the milking demonstration and the sheep shearing demonstration so children understand where we have been and what we did. Even some grown ups don’t know how they did a lot of farming back in the day.

“It’s a good thing to do for the community and it will be a point of interest for the people who come along.”

Mr Lantry has put out the call to farmers who have old machinery sitting around in the paddock that they would like to donate.He’d like the showground to have a collection it could bring out during the show and educate children about old farming methods. 

To donate machinery phone 4930 5052.