Slow Food Earth Market Maitland is in The Levee on May 17 between 2-7pm

HELP A FARMER: Slow Food Hunter Valley leader, and Maitland Citizen of the Year, Amorelle Dempster, with a cup of pumpkin soup. Picture: Jonathan Carroll.
HELP A FARMER: Slow Food Hunter Valley leader, and Maitland Citizen of the Year, Amorelle Dempster, with a cup of pumpkin soup. Picture: Jonathan Carroll.

Warm up with a cup of pumpkin soup in The Levee and help farmers battling drought across the state.

Maitland’s Slow Food Earth Market will serve pumpkin soup in recycled mugs with a slice of Fosterton farm biodynamic bread, drizzled with Hunter Valley Olive Growers and Sellers extra virgin oil, in The Levee on Thursday from 2pm. 

Farmers Matthew and Liam Dennis, and Austin Breiner, donated the pumpkins and Slow Food Hunter Valley chef Amorelle Dempster has been making a huge pot of soup.

It will be served in 100 mugs that have been bought from St Vinnies and sold for $2. Shoppers are encouraged to make a donation to help drought-stricken farmers while they are there. 

It’s farmers helping other farmers, obviously there is a lot of left over pumpkin so we are turning that into soup as a way to help other farmers in need,

Ms Dempster said.

“People who support this will be helping our farmers to use left over pumpkin and also helping farmers in other areas who need our support.”

Take a look at the unfolding crisis across the state for yourself

Click on the + button to enlarge the map and take a better look around. 

Ms Dempster said pumpkins were usually harvested in March, but the unusually warm weather had extended the production time. 

HELP A FARMER: Slow Food Hunter Valley's Jenny Mulcahy, left, with pumkin soup, and Anne Kelly, right, with pumpkins. Picture: Jonathan Carroll.

HELP A FARMER: Slow Food Hunter Valley's Jenny Mulcahy, left, with pumkin soup, and Anne Kelly, right, with pumpkins. Picture: Jonathan Carroll.

“We’re still harvesting them now, and there are still a lot of pumpkins sitting in the paddock,” she said.

“We don’t want to see these pumpkins wasted.”

A variety of pumpkins, and squash, will be available for sale at the market.

There will also be a lot of cauliflowers and broccoli – because of the unseasonably hot weather, as well as freshly dug white Sebago potatoes, late season eggplants, Vietnamese greens, herbs, olives, oil, bread and honey. 

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